Antibiotics

Resistances remain high

Most Read

Salmonella bacteria, along with Campylobacter bacteria, continue to exhibit high resistance to antibiotics.
imago/ageFotostock
Salmonella bacteria, along with Campylobacter bacteria, continue to exhibit high resistance to antibiotics.

Salmonella and Campylobacter bacteria continue to exhibit high levels of antibiotic resistance. This is according to the report published jointly by the European Food Safety Authority (EFSA) and the European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control (ECDC).

According to the report, campylobacteriosis was the most commonly reported zoonosis in the EU in 2020, as well as the most common cause of foodborne illness. According to EFSA and ECDC, Campylobacter bacteria continue to show "very high" resistance to the active ingredient ciprofloxacin. This is an antibiotic of the fluoroquinolone group, which is commonly used to treat bacterial infections in humans. As will be explained, increasing resistance to this class of antibiotic has been observed in Campylobacter jejuni in both humans and broilers.

In Salmonella Enteritidis - the most common type of Salmonella infection in humans, according to EFSA - increasing resistance to the quinolone/fluoroquinolone antibiotic class is occurring, according to the report. In animals, resistance to these antibiotics had generally been at "moderate to high" levels in Campylobacter jejuni and Salmonella bacteria in 2020.

However, it also noted that despite the general increase in resistance, resistance to two critical antibiotics remained low. This is true, it said, for both humans and food-producing animals for bacteria of the genus Escherichia coli, Salmonella and Campylobacter. For example, a decline in resistance to the antibiotic groups of tetracyclines and ampicillins has been observed in ten countries in the treatment of salmonellosis in humans from 2016 to 2020, he said. This was particularly true for the bacterium Salmonella Typhimurium, he said.

Despite the observed decline, however, there is no reason to sound the all-clear in the view of EFSA and ECDC. Resistance to these antibiotics in bacterial infections of humans and animals "remains high," both authorities clarify. AgE
    stats