Raw materials

GMO-free goods remain scarce

Due to the failure of Ukraine as a supplier of GMO-free corn, alternatives must be developed.
imago/Martin Wagner
Due to the failure of Ukraine as a supplier of GMO-free corn, alternatives must be developed.

Global competition for agricultural raw materials is increasing.... "GMO-free" raw materials will remain scarce for an indefinite period. Market players at all levels must prepare for this, DVT and DRV emphasize.

Russia's brutal war of aggression against Ukraine is causing the Black Sea region to drop out indefinitely as a supplier to the European feed industry, according to a joint statement from the German Pet Food Association (DVT) and the German Raiffeisen Federation (DRV). Global competition for scarce resources has therefore increased significantly. This has led to enormous price increases for cereal and protein crops. Security of supply is becoming increasingly important, and efficient land use and optimum feed utilization are the order of the day.

The feed industry must adapt to changes in raw material availability and commodity flows, both globally and nationally. In the case of protein feed, such as rapeseed meal, Germany, with a self-sufficiency rate of only about 30 percent, is absolutely dependent on imports. Due to the loss of the Ukraine as an important supplier of "GM-free" raw materials, considerable quantities of corn would have to be secured as an alternative.

Overall, demand can be met by imports from North and South America, despite significantly rising prices. Here, however, genetically modified varieties dominate cultivation. This narrows the availability of "GM-free" raw materials for the German feed market. Maintaining the supply of "GM-free" goods to the broad market is therefore not realistic in the longer term.

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